Inspiration

Singapore Women Marathoners: Empowering Women Through Running

by On Apr 2, 2020

Celebrate female athletes and the inclusivity of running.

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible

"She remembered who she was and the game changed." - Lalah Deliah

What happens when you cannot join a marathon race now? No worries, you can still be inspired by other peoples' marathons stories at home.

Running a marathon race is not easy, and it's more challenging for female runners.

So to make running a marathon easier for female runners, we are pleased to talk to eight amazing women runners, and have them share their marathon journey with you.

Not only are they just sharing their marathon training tips, all of them have completed more than a marathon race, showing them that as women, they can achieve their dreams and goals too.

To give you a double boost on running tips and advices, we talked to some of the most inspiring women runners in Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines and Thailand and will be sharing with you more of their amazing stories.

For now, let's start first with Singapore women runners.

1. Verna Goh Shilei

Bio: 24 year-old, Lawyer

Verna loves running and exploring new places on foot. One of Verna's favourite things to do when travelling is to discover new running routes around the places she visits.

She is a lawyer and running is her favourite method to relieve tension and stress after a long day of work.

It has brought her closer to many people and allowed her to connect better with people who share the same passion.

Most importantly, she and her boyfriend run together very regularly and she gives credit to running for helping to strengthen their relationship.

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Verna Goh

RS: What inspires you to run a marathon?

Verna: The marathon is the most unpredictable of all of the running events, and it is also the most challenging, both physically and mentally.

As strange as it sounds, I am addicted to the pain and the thrill that comes with pushing myself and endurance running.

I also learn a lot about myself in the process of running - for me, it is a lot about self-discovery, spending time in my head processing a million thoughts and processing life and finding my rhythm and flow.

I think marathon training is the most amazing journey as it is a lot about getting many miles on your feet and I love all these miles.

After some time, it does not really matter whether they are fast or slow miles, I just clock the miles at a pace my body feels like on that particular day and that, to me, is a good or happy run. 

RS: Running a marathon isn't easy. What motivates you to challenge a new marathon race each time?

Verna: The marathon training and the actual marathon itself are both long and you find so many people or things along the way that motivate you.

Every day it might be different. Some days it may be the people that you run with, for me my constant training buddy and companion is my boyfriend, Gordon.

Some days it may be the people and running community that you find yourself a part of, there's something so magical knowing that everybody puts themselves through the same things and cannot explain why they do.

For me, each marathon feels like a new journey of self-discovery, I learn about things I can tolerate, test out new things like shoes and socks.

I make it a lot more about the journey than the marathon itself - I mean completing the marathon feels great, but then the whole four months before that were probably even better!

RS: There are different kinds of training for runners as everyone is different. So, which marathon training do you find suits you the most so far?

Verna: I don't really do any specific training - for me what works best is just clocking the miles on my feet. I like making easy to medium runs and do them probably five to six days a week.

I have tried a couple of hard track sessions just to tune up the speed in my legs, but I find that ultimately, what's most important is getting the mileage in (whatever that entails for you).

I enjoy running hills though, and find that running up hills of varying gradients really builds strength in the legs.

RS: Most of the runners have hit rock bottom in their running journey. How about you?

Verna: I think it's really about the mindset change and how you view running. Sometimes it's good to take a step back and explore a new place on foot! It may provide you with a fresh perspective and newfound enthusiasm.

Just don't let your training get stale, it should always excite you and leave you feeling fresh and craving more, rather than bored and uninspired!

I think people really help, sometimes running with different people might bring you different perspectives and keep running from getting stale! Find people who lift you up when you're stuck on rock bottom.

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Verna Goh

Running means that I am living the best version of myself and giving myself the opportunity to do hard things.

RS: What is the one thing that you would like to improve during your marathon journey?

Verna: I would like to perhaps try out more speed sessions because that is something that I have never really tried and am not used to! But my boyfriend and running friends do hit the track once a week, so I would perhaps want to try to incorporate that in my training.

Other than that, I would like to improve the actual marathon running - I am not great at pacing myself so that is something I am still working on. Usually am overly excited in the first few miles of the marathon!

RS: What are your running goals?

Verna: I would definitely want to do more local races, the ones that have been happening for quite a while. I would also want to run for good causes that I believe in.

I would also want to add more overseas marathons to my list. I am running the Boston Marathon next year (April 2020), but am planning to really just enjoy the atmosphere and fall in love with the city of Boston because I heard that the spirit there is just phenomenal!

I am also planning to do a run in Australia, perhaps in Sydney or Gold Coast, depending on where my legs (and heart) take me! Definitely with my boyfriend Gordon because we love to travel for running!

RS: As a woman marathoner, what encouragements could you give to all women to join a marathon race? 

Verna: You never know till you start, so why not? Sometimes it's about the little steps you take, break a marathon down into little bite-sized chunks and tackle it one chunk at a time.

A marathon is a long slow journey, so enjoy the process and don't forget to stop and smell the roses! 

RS: What does completing a marathon race means to you?

Verna: It means that I am living the best version of myself and giving myself the opportunity to do hard things.

The distance may seem scary, even intimidating, a lot can happen over the span of forty-two kilometres, but at the end of the day, you know it is a matter of time before you get there and better sooner than later anyway!

You can follow Verna on Instagram: @summersilhouettes

2. Jemaine Goh Chien Ling

Bio: 30 year-old, Personal Assistant 

Jemaine completed her first marathon in 2011 (SCSM). It was a memorable experience as she and her brother and sister (Jasmine Goh) were also running their first marathon race. It was their first siblings marathon.

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Jemaine Goh

RS: Why do you want to run a marathon race?

Jemaine: I like to run since young, but running a marathon was never in my mind.

After I completed my marathon in 2011, my thoughts of running marathons changed. It is challenging but fun in a way, as I love to admire the scenic surroundings as I run, especially overseas marathons.  

RS: What motivates you to challenge yourself for each marathon race?

Jemaine: Achieving timing that is faster than previous is my motivation for each marathon race. It felt awesome knowing that I am getting faster and stronger.

RS: How do you train for your marathon race?

Jemaine: I believe in being an overall strong runner as it will increase the longevity of my running journey and help me stay injury free.

Thus, I incorporate running drills and functional workouts to my runs. I follow closely the training programme of i-Runs as I am a trainer there too. I believe a good runner should not just run, but also add strengthening workouts into his run sessions.

RS: How do you overcome obstacles faced during your marathon journey?

Jemaine: Yes, I do encounter rock bottoms! I had a serious fall in 2016 and needed 13 stitches for each knee. That moment, I felt disappointed, thinking my running journey was over.

But as I was recovering, I started listening to my body and my heart, working with positive mindset and implementing new habits that were serving me.

I made a decision to truly love myself, my scars and all, and believe that whatever life throws at me, good or bad, I am powerful enough to overcome it.

From there, everything began to change. In two months, I went on to my HKSCM 2017 and got a personal best. Since then, I am getting faster and stronger and better!  

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Jemaine Goh

I love my body now more than when I was younger because running encourages self-awareness.

RS: What is the one thing that you would like to improve during your marathon journey?

Jemaine: Speed. So, I can achieve my desired timing.

RS: What is your short-term goal running goal?

Jemaine: I hope to do well for SCSM 2020 and get the podium with my sister Jasmine.

RS: As a woman marathoner, what encouragements could you could give to other women to join marathon?

Jemaine: I truly feel this quote and hope that this quote can motivate others as well. "You can never be sure. That's what makes the marathon both fearsome and fascinating.

The deeper you go into the unknown, the more uncertain you become. But then you finish. And you wonder later, 'How did I do that?' This question compels you to keep making the journey from the usual to the magical." -Joe Henderson

RS: What does running a marathon means to you?

Jemaine: Running a marathon helps clear my mind and free my spirit. I love my body now more than when I was younger because running encourages self-awareness.

You can follow Jemaine on Instagram: @yrotsreh

3. Chiam Li Ping

Bio: 31 year-old, Client Relations in Financial Services firm 

Li Ping works as a financial service professional and was a National dragon boater.

Now, she is an avid marathoner who has completed the 6 World Marathon Majors in Oct 2019 to commemorate her grandma's 6th death anniversary.

With the completion of the 6 Majors, she hopes to continue this running journey to more places around the world to experience what each country and culture has to offer.

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Li Ping

RS: Why do you want to run a marathon race?

Li Ping: Marathon running for me was happenstance, as running became a coping mechanism for the loss of my beloved grandmother and the luck of getting a ballot entry in the 2014 Tokyo Marathon at around the same time of her death, gave the extra impetus to train for it.

Running is a preferred activity as it suits my hectic lifestyle (I work long hours), Singapore is such a safe country, I can choose to have a workout in the wee hours of the morning or late at night. 

RS: What motivates you to challenge yourself for each marathons?

Li Ping: Every race gives me an opportunity to test my limits and put months of hard work into that  3+hours and I find that rewarding enough to want to do it over and over again.

Also, with every training cycle and every race, it offers up learning lessons in every kind! Sometimes you learn more about yourself or transfer those lessons to daily life. 

RS: How do you train for your marathon race?

Li Ping: I've had 2 coaches by far as I had only started to take marathons a bit more seriously in 2017. First, was broadly a mileage based coach and my current coach is heart rate (HR) / science based.

Both methods have their strengths, so I had incorporated mileage to my current coach's HR based training programme, which is customised to my current physiological state as determined by lactate threshold and fuel efficiency tests. 

RS: How do you overcome your rock bottom running days?

Li Ping: Thankfully, it hasn't hit me that badly yet! Emotionally, I have a bunch of close running buddies to bounce off thoughts and feelings, so that helps a lot in keeping rock bottom far away!

For injuries or even slight niggles closer to the race, I understand some runners will worry and fear how such injuries will impact their race and feel rock bottom, but usually I will not let such feelings overrun me.

I prefer a clinical approach to it by seeking medical help and follow through with treatment and think rationally about whether to race or not. 

Though, I take marathon training seriously, but I like to keep it fun and varied, so I guess this helps too. 

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Li Ping

If you can complete a marathon training cycle and the race, you can be conditioned to do anything.

RS: What is the one thing that you would like to improve during your marathon journey?

Li Ping: More sleep! Getting sufficient rest is much lacking in my training now, as I work long hours and have other commitments outside of marathon training too. 

RS: What are some of your short term goals?

Li Ping: In the first half of 2020, I am aiming to complete my first 100km race and focus on getting to sub 3 hours for my marathon timing in the second half of 2020.

RS: As a woman marathoner, how would you encourage other women to run a marathon?

Li Ping: First, to stay healthy and fit, because you need this to be able to enjoy life fully.

Second, it is empowering, because if you can complete a marathon training cycle and the race, you can be conditioned to do anything.

Third, for more vain reasons, keep that few kgs off to fit into nice things.

Last but not least, chow down that chocolate cake guilt free, but of course balance is key.

RS: What does running a marathon means to you?

Li Ping: It's a constant reminder that grit pays off. The time and effort invested is almost always 1:1 and it may not be all about clocking fast times, but the journey to the start line of each race already is an achievement that you have accomplished. 

You can follow Li Ping on Instagram: @lpchiam

4. Jenny Huang

Bio: American based in Singapore, 46 year-old, Physiotherapist 

Jenny moved to Singapore in 2003 and is a mom of a 18 year-old daughter and a 15 year-old son. Since then she has learned to love and root herself in Singapore with her love of running. 

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Jenny Huang

RS: Why do you want to run a marathon?

Jenny: I love running and the challenge of the discipline in training, in mental grit, in knowing you are running on your own race each and every time. 

RS: What motivates you to challenge yourself for each marathon race?

Jenny: I love pushing my own comfort zone because life only gets better when you’re pushing yourself above what you think you can. Because, you can. 

RS: How do you train for your marathon race?

Jenny: I follow my coach training and trust him.  He is also my better half. 

RS: How do you overcome your bad running days?

Jenny: Remind myself that it’s what I love. Running keeps me happy and stop thinking about what I need to do, but what I want to do. 

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Jenny Huang

Women are here to break glass ceilings and that means crossing the next finish line of a marathon strong. 

RS: What is the one thing that you would like to improve during your marathon journey?

Jenny: I would like to find more time to run and learn to increase my mileage with my body adapting to the mileage. 

RS: What are some of your short term running goals?

Jenny: I simply want to qualify for Boston again, so I can visit my daughter in university as a bonus when I’m in Boston. 

RS: As a woman marathoner, how would you encourage other women to run a marathon?

Jenny: Women can do it all as long as we put our mind to it. Women are here to break glass ceilings and that means crossing the next finish line of a marathon strong. 

RS: What does running a marathon means to you?

Jenny: It means I am able to juggle being a mom, running my own business while pursuing my passion. That is happiness.  

You can follow Jenny on Instagram: @runjenny.run

5. Jasmine Goh Mei Ling

Bio: 40 year-old, Financial Consultant

Jasmine started running in August 2011 after signing up for her first marathon (SCSM 2011) with her siblings. She wanted to shed off a few pounds and felt running was the easiest sport to pick up since she could do it anytime and anywhere. That year, her brother and sister completed their first Marathon together. 

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Jasmine Goh

RS: Why do you like to run a marathon?

Jasmine: Running is the easiest sport that anyone can pick up and enjoy. That was the reason why I started running back in 2011. I fell in love with the challenges of running long distance.

If 'Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you get', then, running a marathon is also like that, you never know how each race will turn out! Running marathons or ultras, can be full of surprises. You need to constantly adapt on the go!  

RS: What motivates you to challenge yourself for each marathon race?

Jasmine: Every race is different because different day/place/time brings different race conditions.

I love the ability of being aware of my body throughout the race and the challenge of constantly readjusting my race execution, so that I can finish the race strong. Each race is a unique self-discovery journey for me.

RS: How do you train for your marathon race?

Jasmine: I believe in heart rate training. I also strongly encourage every runner to add strength and conditioning workouts to be a stronger and a better runner!

At my age, I do need additional help for faster recovery, so I do regular laser acupuncture. I have a running coach (Coach Ben Pulham of Coached Fitness) and a S&C coach (Coach Chris Lim of Ziklag Fitness). My TCM doctor is Mr Rodney Lim (Laser Acupuncture Centre).

RS: How to you overcome your bad running days?

Jasmine: Of course I do! That is part and parcel of any journey, just like life! I always say that the longest and possibly the hardest distance I have ever run, is the distance between my ears!

Taming the negativity in the mind chatter takes vigilance and constant work. My mantra is 'Tough times never last!'.  I also constantly remind myself my biggest reason to run—which is to inspire my kids to “dream big because nothing is impossible”.  

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Jasmine Goh

Running lets an ordinary woman like me, accomplish extraordinary things.

RS: What is the one thing that you would like to improve during your marathon journey?

Jasmine: I want to reach out to more runners, especially female runners and inspire them to become better stronger runners. I hope to motivate more ladies to do their first marathon.

I want women to know how powerful they really are! I am with X-runners Club and also a trainer conducting training at i-Runs for HPB. Through these platforms, I hope to impart my knowledge to help more runners to achieve their running goals.

RS: What is your short term running goal?

Jasmine: Perhaps run my first 100 miles.

RS: As a woman marathoner, how would you encourage other women to run a marathon?

Jasmine: Not everyone reading this now, can run a marathon tomorrow. But almost everyone reading this, can start preparing for a marathon tomorrow. All it takes is an intention and a first step! That was how I started!

RS: What does running a marathon means to you?

Jasmine: Running makes everything that doesn't matter disappear in the moment. Nothing else matters except the steps and breaths that I am taking when I run. Running lets an ordinary woman like me, accomplish extraordinary things. I am forever grateful for this sport. 

You can follow Jasmine on Instagram: @go_jasminegoh

6. Sherlynn Tan

Bio: 27 year-old, Software Developer

Sherlynn started running about 4 to 5 years ago. She loves running as it helps to keep her fit and is also a great way for her to destress after work.

Today running has become a routine that she has to do every day in order to feel good about herself.

She started joining races in 2015 and took part in her first marathon at the end of that year, at the Standard Chartered Marathon Singapore 2015.

At that time, it was something she had wanted to check off her bucket list. But after the marathon, she didn’t feel good because she had not trained for it, and that feeling spurred her to sign up for another marathon to hit a better timing.

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Sherlynn Tan

RS: Why did you love running a marathon?

Sherlynn: Running in general is really accessible and convenient. Just put on a pair of shoes and head out anywhere to run. I enjoy doing longer distances in particular because it makes me feel good and I derive a sense of achievement from it.

Training for marathons also helps with stress relief. All that time it takes to do the training runs is great to work through problems and issues.  And, there is that bonus of the endorphins kicking in and feeling the runners high.  

RS: What motivates you to challenge yourself for each marathon race?

Sherlynn: For one, I like routines and marathon training offers a sense of purpose and structure. 

This quote aptly describes my sentiments:

"We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organise and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too." -JFK 

It is also empowering and fun to push your limits and to see how fast you can go and whether you can beat your best time. It is amazing what the human body can do and the realisation that you are capable of running for 42.195 kilometres straight.

On top of that, the energy and excitement of the race day are addictive, from the loud music on while everyone is anxiously waiting in the corral for the race to start, to the awesome spectators cheering you on, to the hilarious costumes of some fellow runners, to the funny signs people hold along the route, to the euphoria of running toward the finish line and to that first sip of beer after the finish.

RS: How do you train for your marathon race?

Sherlynn: Some people enjoy doing more speed-based training and incorporate track workouts during the week. I enjoy doing mostly slower paced, easier (but longer) runs. A typical week for me consists of easy runs throughout the week and a harder long run on Sunday.

RS: How do you overcome your worst running period?

Sherlynn: One of the worst injuries I have had was a foot injury which I had to stop running for 6 months.

Even walking was painful then. It was a long and really frustrating period. I learnt a lot through the process though - it taught me not to neglect the small things like proper warm ups, strengthening exercise and training smartly. 

What helped was doing cross-training - I turned to indoor cycling to maintain aerobic fitness, and that reduced the anxiety that I had about losing fitness while I could not run. 

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Sherlynn Tan

Be patient and consistent in your running and you will reap the results.

RS: What is the one thing that you would like to improve during your marathon journey?

Sherlynn: I have dealt with many running injuries in the past years. Through each injury, I learnt more about proper running biomechanics as well as ways to strengthen different parts of the body which would reduce injury risks. I hope to be diligent in doing prehab strengthening work and be able to be injury-free as much as possible.

RS: What is your short-term running goal?

Sherlynn: To better my personal times at the half and full marathons. 

RS: As a woman marathoner, how would you encourage other women to run a marathon?

Sherlynn: Be patient and consistent in your running and you will reap the results. Running a marathon unlocks a huge sense of achievement - there is an amazing feeling of fulfilment after completing a marathon. One runner might be chasing the world record.

Another might be simply looking for a personal best time. Then there are those who delightfully aims to cross the finish line. But regardless of the goal, every marathon runner understands the feeling of accomplishment.

Though the finish line is a mere line drawn across the road, it holds some type of special power. It is the point where joy and pain collide, creating a euphoria and an addiction. All in all, you just have to do it all over again. The experience is one of a kind.

RS: What does running a marathon mean to you?

Sherlynn: I enjoy the process and continuous journey towards training for a marathon. Running the marathon provides an opportunity to test my limits and validate my training. 

You can follow Sherlynn on Instagram: @sherlynntan

7. Priscilla Chew

Bio: 31 year-old, Writer

Priscilla started running in early 2012 to improve her fitness levels, and she signed up for a 10km race (Yellow Ribbon Prison Run) about six months after that.

Upon completion of that race, Priscilla became hooked onto running and began looking for more races to do, progressing from 10km to 15km and 21km and then the full marathon. The rest is history. 

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Priscilla Chew

RS: Why did you start running a marathon?

Priscilla: I love the feeling of going out for a run and getting into the zone. For the duration of my run, it’s like all my worries are gone. It’s just me, alone with my thoughts.

RS: What motivates you to challenge yourself for each marathon race?

Priscilla: It’s the feeling of constantly pushing my limits, to see how much I can improve each time. It’s the feeling of bettering myself and achieving my goals, that makes me want to keep on running marathons.

RS: How do you train for your marathon races?

Priscilla: For the past few years, I have been training with Coached, a heart-rate training programme that allows you to track, optimise and enjoy your training.

This training programme has worked for me and so far, I have improved my marathon timings from seven and a half hours, down to 4:21:36. and even setting a new tropical personal best at the StanChart Singapore Marathon earlier this month (4:30:03).

Coached trainings are quite different to most training programmes, in that we train by time and heart rate, instead of by distance and pace. When I am preparing for a marathon, I train at least five times a week and my programme consists of an endurance run (tempo), a hill run, a strength run, a speed run (intervals) and a long run.

Coached strongly believes in the 80-20 percent rule, in that most of the trainings is to be done in an easy, or conversational pace, in order to build a strong aerobic base for marathon training.

Besides improving my running times, this programme has also helped me to stay injury-free for the past few years.

RS: How do you overcome your rock bottom moments in your running journey?

Priscilla: I hit rock bottom in 2014 when I was injured with compartment syndrome and I couldn’t run at all without suffering immense pain. That was the worst period in my running journey and I was very dejected, depressed and irritable.

The worst part about it was when I found myself indulging in emotional eating in a bid to counter the lack of running endorphins and overcome my bad moods.

Furthermore, it also didn’t help that I had a half marathon fast approaching too. 

But after some searching, I found a physiotherapist who helped me to get back to running again without pain. So I was really grateful for that.

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Priscilla Chew

I see marathon as a metaphor of life - that is, a person cannot get ahead in life and achieve what they want, unless hard work and effort is put into achieving their dreams.

RS: What is the one thing that you would like to improve during your marathon journey?

Priscilla: I am constantly striving to improve my marathon timings, but at the same time, not forgetting to have fun and enjoy myself along the way.

I hope to continue to improve my coordination and strike a balance between these two.

While it is good to be competitive, there is no point in being so competitive until you lose your passion for running.

RS: Since you have been in the marathon scene for quite some time. What are some of your short term goals?

Priscilla: I am currently working towards a sub four hour marathon, which I hope to achieve either at the Rotterdam Marathon in April or the Chicago Marathon in October 2020.

RS: As a woman marathoner, how would you encourage other women to run a marathon?

Priscilla: Aspiring would-be female marathoners may be intimidated about the prospect of racing alongside guys who are usually faster and stronger than them.

But my advice is… don’t be. Rather than letting others intimidate or scare you, just focus on yourself.

Run at your own pace, no matter how fast or slow you are. As long as you complete the journey and finish the distance, then it is an accomplishment in itself.

RS: What does running a marathon means to you?

Priscilla: Running a marathon represents dedication, drive and purpose. Months of training are needed to prepare for the race, and the final 26.2 miles on race day represent the fruition of all the months of hard work and effort that have been put in towards achieving a personal goal.

In this way, I also see a marathon as a metaphor of life - that is, a person cannot get ahead in life and achieve what they want, unless hard work and effort is put into achieving their dreams.

You can follow Priscilla on Instagram: @prisgooner

8. Cindy Ong

Bio: Financial Consultant

Cindy started running in 2016 to lose weight and discovered some talents in running in 2017 and turned competitive. Soh Rui Yong has been coaching her since 2018 and she managed to complete Standard Chartered Singapore Marathon 2018 as one of the top 10 local girls. 

Singapore Women Marathoners: Make the impossible possible
Marathoner: Cindy

RS: Why did you start running marathon?

Cindy: I enjoy running marathons because life is like a marathon. With a goal in mind, you keep running, change strategy and track sometimes, pace yourself right or take a break when needed. Endure the challenges and emerge stronger.

RS: What motivates you to challenge yourself for each marathon race?

Cindy: I guess, like any normal human being, seeing improvement is one of the motivations. Another motivation is being able to share the passion with others.

As an X-Runners co-founder and trainer at HPB i-RUN, I enjoy being able to guide and help others in attaining the goal of running a marathon. Helping others get better in running and eventually completing a marathon motivates me. 

RS: How is your marathon training plan like?

Cindy: My training consists of easy runs, speed intervals and long runs on one of the weekends. I find the long runs really useful. Through running the longer distances, I put them on my feet and allow my body to adapt to the distance. It also trains my mental state.

Running long distances can be very boring and painful. At some point, the thought of giving up will creep in especially when the legs start getting tired or the weather turns hot. So, I really find long distance training useful for training not just the body but also the mind.

RS: Did you ever hit rock bottom in your running journey?

Cindy: I did! I contracted dengue fever in August and due to the eagerness to resume training in order to win prizes at races, I jumped right back into training. However, the plan backfired and I got injured. I had to pull out from key buildup races, including my race.

At the same time, I had to rest from time to time whenever my injury was triggered, which affected my overall performance. It reached a point where I had to completely rest. I felt really down when I could not run the Asics Relay with my team and had to replace myself. 

The key to it is to accept that fact and that the body needs to rest. Once you have made peace with the fact, you will allow true recovery to take place. During recovery, engage in alternative sport or strength and conditioning to help maintain the fun in the sport.

For me, I also started reflecting and changing my attitude towards attaining the end goal and remembering to focus on the process.

10 Motivational Trail Runners in Singapore
Marathoner: Cindy

Running marathons gives a woman empowerment over herself. She would discover that she is enough to face the giants of her life.

RS: What is the one thing that you would like to improve during your marathon journey?

Cindy: I started to include strength and conditioning during my injury. However, I would like to include its consistency in my next block of training instead.

RS: What are some of your medium/short term running goals?

Cindy: My medium goal is to complete the Boston marathon since this requires qualification and I have qualified for it. In the long run, I hope to complete all the World Major Marathons. I also hope to be able to help more X-Runners reach their marathon dreams.

RS: As a woman marathoner, how would you encourage other women to run a marathon?

Cindy: More often than not, a woman tends to many people's needs around them and forget to leave time and space for herself.

Running marathons gives a woman empowerment over herself. She would discover that she is enough to face the giants of her life. During marathon running, she will also have a lot of time on her own. 

RS: What does running a marathon means to you?

Cindy: I love overcoming challenges and running marathon gives me that. Running marathons is a way for me to have my time and space, to reflect and realign with myself.

You can follow Cindy on Instagram: @coxi07

Empowering Women Through Running

Completing a marathon have shown that women runners can constantly break barriers in a sport which have typically been dominated by male competitors.

Want to get started with running? Why not start first with the first ever woman-focused online race series—Floral Women Online Race Series 2020. With a race distance of 10km, 21km or 42km to choose from, you can run any time which is convenient to you, anywhere, even on a treadmill or elliptical machine.

Find out more on how you can inspire other women to take control of their health.

In these stressful and uncertain times, getting updated with accurate and useful information has never been so critical. No matter how unsettled the future feels, RunSociety will remain with you, delivering high quality news for free so we can all make critical decisions about our lives and health. Together we can overcome.

What we can do to help the situation is to keep our body and immune system in peak condition. If you are allowed or able to run outdoors, please do so cautiously but not panicky. Join our free online race to motivate you and pay tribute to our frontline heroes.

Samantha is an editor at RunSociety. A digital expert with a focus on the research and development of thought provoking and resourceful content, Samantha love Yoga and incorporate running in her weekly workout whenever she can.

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